July 29, 2015

Great Review of Predicting the Unpredictable

By Johanna Rothman

Ryan Ripley “highly recommends” Predicting the Unpredictable: Pragmatic Approaches to Estimating Cost or Schedule. See his post: Pragmatic Agile Estimation: Predicting the Unpredictable.

He says this:

This is a practical book about the work of creating software and providing estimates when needed. Her estimation troubleshooting guide highlights many of the hidden issues with estimating such as: multitasking, student syndrome, using the wrong units to estimate, and trying to estimates things that are too big. — Ryan Ripley

Thank you, Ryan!

PredictingUnpredictable-small See Predicting the Unpredictable: Pragmatic Approaches to Estimating Cost or Schedule for more information.

July 29, 2015 12:31 PM

July 23, 2015

7 Tips for Valuing Features in a Backlog

By Johanna Rothman

Many product owners have a tough problem. They need so many of the potential features in the roadmap, that they feel as if everything is #1 priority. They realize they can’t actually have everything as #1, and it’s quite difficult for them to rank the features.

This is the same problem as ranking for the project portfolio. You can apply similar thinking.

Once you have a roadmap, use these tips to help you rank the features in the backlog:

  1. Should you do this feature at all? I normally ask this question about small features, not epics. However, you can start with the epic (or theme) and apply this question there. Especially if you ask, “Should we do this epic for this release?”
  2. Use Business Value Points to see the relative importance of a feature. Assign each feature/story a unique value. If you do this with the team, you can explain why you rank this feature in this way. The discussion is what’s most valuable about this.

  3. Use Cost of Delay to understand the delay that not having this feature would incur for the release.

  4. Who has Waste from not having this feature? Who cannot do their work, or has a workaround because this feature is not done yet?

  5. Who is waiting for this feature? Is it a specific customer, or all customers, or someone else?

  6. Pair-wise and other comparison methods work. You can use single or double elimination as a way to say, “Let’s do this one now and that feature later.”

  7. What is the risk of doing this feature or not doing this feature?

Don Reinertsen advocates doing the Weighted Shortest Job first.  That requires knowing the cost of delay for the work and the estimated duration of the work. If you keep your stories small, you might have a good estimate. If not, you might not know what the weighted shortest job is.

And, if you keep your stories small, you can just use the cost of delay.

Jason Yip wrote Problems I have with SAFe-style WSJF, which is a great primer on Weighted Shortest Job First.

I’ll be helping product owners work through how to value their backlogs in Product Owner Training for Your Agency, starting in August. When you are not inside the organization, but supplying services to the organization, these decisions can be even more difficult to make. Want to join us?

July 23, 2015 01:37 PM

July 16, 2015

Product Manager, Product Owner, or Business Analyst?

By Johanna Rothman

Do you have a title such as product manager, product owner, or business analyst?

We hear  these titles all the time. What does each do?

Here is how I have seen successful agile projects and programs use people in these positions. Note that I am discussing agile projects and programs.

The product manager creates the roadmap. She has the product vision over the entire life of the product. Typically, what’s In the roadmap are larger than epics—they are themes or feature sets. 

Product management means thinking strategically about the product. You might require several projects or programs to achieve what the product manager wants as a strategic vision.

Product owners (PO) work with agile teams to translate the strategic vision into Minimum Viable Products. The PO decides when the team(s) have done enough to release. See the release frequency image to understand the cost and value of releasing.

The business analyst may do any of these things. In my experience, I have seen business analysts focus on “what does this requirement/feature/story really mean to the team and/or the product?” I have seen fewer BAs do the strategic visioning of the product over its lifetime. I have seen BAs work with POs when the PO was not available enough for the team. I have seen BAs do great work breaking stories into smaller components of value, not architectural components.

Your team might have different names for these positions. Each team needs the strategic lifetime-of-the-product view; the tactical view for the next iteration or so and the knowledge of how to re-rank the backlog; and the ability to translate stories into small valuable chunks. 

Can one person do each of these things? It depends on the person. I have found it difficult to move quickly from the tactical to strategic and back again (or vice versa). Maybe you know how. For me, that is a form of multitasking. 

The more important questions are: do you have the roles you need, at the time you need them on your team? If you are one of these people, do you know how to perform these roles? If you are outside the organization in some way, do you know what you need to do, to perform these roles?

If you don’t know what to do to help your team, consider participating in Product Owner for Agencies training. Marcus Blankenship and I will help you learn what to do, and coach you in real time as to how to do it best for your team. I hope to see you there.

July 16, 2015 05:44 PM